Stacia Brown

Stacia L. Brown was born in Lansing, MI. She grew up in Baltimore, MD–the county, not the city. (Only other Baltimoreans will truly understand why it’s necessary to make that distinction. Everyone else just keeps asking if she’s ever lived by where they used to film The Wire and then gets genuinely bummed out when she says no.) She graduated from Trinity College (now Trinity Washington University) in DC, with a BA in English that didn’t really help her land any jobs. (Don’t let them hype you on college as a golden ticket to employment, kids, because… not so much.) She worked a few office gigs, while trying to jump-start her writing career.

At 27, she finished an MFA in fiction at Sarah Lawrence College. She spent the next six and a half years working as an adjunct writing professor first in Michigan, then in Maryland, while also working as a freelance writer for various publications, including The Washington Post, where she currently serves as a weekly contributor, New Republic, Rolling Stone, The Atlantic, Salon, and others. For a complete list of her online publications, visit her bylines page.

In 2007, she won the Zora Neale Hurston-Bessie Head Fiction Award for a short story titled, “A Revolution Like Vinyl.” Her short story, “Be Longing,” was selected for publication in It’s All Love: Black Writers on Soul Mates, Family, and Friends (Doubleday/Harlem Moon 2009), edited by Marita Golden. Her short story, “Shhh,” was featured at Union Station Magazine and subsequently nominated for the 2011 Dzanc Best of the Web anthology. Her poem, “Combat,” appears in Reverie: Midwest African American Literature. Her essay on adjuncting as a single mother appears in the Demeter Press title, Laboring Positions: Black Women, Mothering and the Academy, edited by Sekile Nzinga-Johnson.

Stacia served as the 2013-14 Editorial Fellow for Community Engagement at Colorlines. In June 2015, she was part of the inaugural Thread at Yale class. She was a 2015 participant in Women’s Media Center’s Progressive Women’s Voices training program.

In November 2015, Stacia became the creator and producer of Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City, a radio and podcast series that tells intergenerational stories of place and memory in Baltimore City. Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City is part of the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR)’s 2015 Finding America: Localore project and is produced in partnership with WEAA 88.9.

She has also founded an online community dedicated to issues specific to single mothers of color: Beyond Baby Mamas. To join the Beyond Baby Mamas community, like the Facebook page, subscribe to the YouTube channel, and follow on Twitter and Tumblr.

Stacia resides with her amazing daughter, Story, in Baltimore, Maryland.

The Rise of Charm City's exploration of Morgan State University's 150-year history continues in Episode 14: "A Modern Study of Morganic Chemistry."

A view of Morgan State University Campus from WEAA, on the third floor of the School of Global Journalism and Communications.
Stacia Brown / The Rise of Charm City

The Rise of Charm City is delighted to present our second season premiere, "Episode 13: Protect Your Vital Morgan," the first of a two-part series on the 150-year history of Morgan State University.

Local designer Carlous Palmer.
Stacia Brown / The Rise of Charm City

Dressed and Highly Favored provides listeners with a brief window into Black Baltimore's history of fashion merchandising and design. 

Ali Post / Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

The 12th — and final — episode of our first season, "Glow in the Park," presents a history of Druid Hill Park, the third oldest public urban park in the country. 

Mawish Raza / Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Episode 11, "The Rise of Charm City — LIVE!" is a broadcast of our very first live performance event, held on July 14 at the historic Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Museum. 

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