Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

The Kansas City Royals have earned their first World Series title in 30 years, staging a dramatic Game 5 comeback to beat the New York Mets 7-2.

They took home the series four games to one.

The final game featured a stunning extra-innings turnaround. It started as a pitchers' duel: the Mets' Matt Harvey against Kansas City's Edinson Volquez.

Beating the Mets 5-3, the Kansas City Royals came from behind in the eighth inning, placing themselves one win closer to a World Series title. A Royals rally and a fatal error by second baseman Daniel Murphy leaves Kansas City one game away from their first championship title in 30 years.

We all know "password" is no good, and "1234567" is asking for trouble.

But the more we try to strengthen our passwords, the harder we make them to remember.

It's a thoroughly modern problem — but researchers at the University of Southern California have found a very old solution. Instead of passwords, consider the passpoem:

The tiny villagers explore
a speaker company rapport

You probably won't be one of the few souls to meet Pope Francis on his visit to the U.S. next week. But hey, it could happen, and if it does, don't you want to be ready?

Here's a primer on what you need to know so, at the very least, you'll be well-prepared for small talk about him, if not to him.

Etiquette

The pope is never introduced. He literally is a man who needs no introduction. (You, of course, ought to be introduced by somebody.)

Flavia Pennetta has defeated Roberta Vinci to win the U.S. Open, in a women's final that was an all-Italian affair.

The two women have more in common than their nationality. They were opponents and doubles partners as kids, the Associated Press reports. It was the first major final for both. And they were both outperforming expectations just by being there: Vinci was unseeded, and Pennetta was the 26th seed.

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