This Week on WEAA

The Mod Squad, Taya Graham and Stephen Janis of the Real News Network.
First Edition / WEAA

First Edition June 14: Sessions' Letter to Congress; Ongoing Violence in Baltimore

The Mod Squad, Taya Graham and Stephen Janis of The Real News Network, are guest hosts for Sean Yoes. They discuss Attorney General Jeff Sessions' letter to Congress. Sessions is actually seeking permission and plans to prosecute those for growing marijuana for legal and medical reasons.

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Music

The Baltimore Blend

Thursday Morning Jam Session: Jazz Trombonist Rufus Roundtree

The Baltimore Blend's Thursday Morning Jam Session welcomes another high energy, no limit music experience with jazz trombonist Rufus Roundtree.

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NPR News

The Army is dropping the use of the term "negro" in an official document that listed it as an acceptable way to refer to African Americans.

CNN first pointed out the document on Thursday and just hours later the Army responded by revising the document.

The Associated Press reports:

Listen and learn, the saying goes.

But are students and teachers these days fully listening to each other?

What, exactly, is good listening, and why does it matter when it comes to learning? Is "close listening" a doorway to understanding that too many of us are keeping only half-open?

Japan is one step closer to restarting its nuclear power operations, as regional authorities approved the restart of a nuclear reactor in the city of Satsuma Sendai in the Kagoshima Prefecture.

Remember, Japan shut down all of its nuclear reactors after a triple meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in 2011, which was triggered by a massive earthquake and tsunami.

The southern Chinese city of Macau is the global capital of casino gambling. Last year, revenue rose about 20 percent, hitting $45 billion — nearly seven times the haul on the Las Vegas strip.

But since June, Macau's take has tumbled every month, according to local government figures. In October, revenue plunged 23 percent, the biggest drop on record.

Insiders say China's anti-corruption crackdown is scaring off high rollers — including corrupt officials.

In 2011, NPR aired an interview with retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Max Voelz remembering his wife, Staff Sgt. Kim Voelz. Kim was killed while disarming an IED in 2003. Here, in an update to that interview, Max talks to a fellow bomb tech who helped him cope, and an NPR listener who reached out after hearing him on the radio.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the first installment of the ongoing series.

Even 10 years after the battle for Fallujah, it's hard for Marine Master Gunnery Sgt. Torain Kelley to talk about some things that happened.

"We had people shooting at us from up [on] the rooftops, from the houses, from the sewers or wherever they could take a shot at us from," he says.

OOPS! 'Morning Edition's' Best Bloopers

Nov 7, 2014

Painter Salvador Dalí once said, "Have no fear of perfection — you'll never reach it."

Writer George Orwell opined, "The essence of being human is that one does not seek perfection."

And, as the great philosopher Tina Fey says, "Perfect is overrated. Perfect is boring."

It is in this spirit that, as part of this week's celebration of Morning Edition's 35th anniversary, we share some of our less-than-perfect moments.

As cases of a worrisome respiratory virus continue to pop up in the Middle East, scientists who study it in the U.S. are struggling to understand how they'll be affected by a government moratorium on certain kinds of experiments.

Bans on same-sex marriage in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee were confirmed by a federal court Thursday, in a ruling that provides yet another shift in the legal fight over the issue.

The 2-1 decision handed down by the Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit comes after the four states had argued this summer that their voters had the authority to decide whether to ban marriage between a same-sex couple.

It's a record most Alaskans might wish they could give back: The Center for Public Integrity calculates that KTUU TV in Anchorage ran more U.S. Senate ads this cycle than any other television station in the country — 12,300 in all.

Those Senate spots made up the bulk of the 13,400 political ads since January. KTUU General Manager Andrew MacLeod says 2014 was the the station's busiest year ever. By contrast, off-year 2013 was relatively light.

Pages

Stepping Out with Your Girl Cheryl: June 16-18

Hi, this is Your Girl Cheryl with What’s Hot this Father’s Day Weekend!

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June Community Cares

The main objective of the Riley Hawkins Avengers Foundation, Inc. is to rescue our children from the chaos of the streets by instilling values of family, friendship, honor and responsibility in them, and channeling their energy to become a positive force in their communities.

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