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This Week on WEAA

First Edition Feb 21: HBCU Coalition Court Proceedings; Dr. Whitehead on Teaching Black History

On the final day of the court proceedings connected to the HBCU Coalition lawsuit against the state of Maryland, First Edition host Sean Yoes gets a report from AFRO reporter Deborah Bailey.

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Wealthy Radio host Deborah Owens.
Deborah Owens / Facebook

Wealthy Radio Feb 21

Barnaby Manor Elementary School Visit by Jay Baker at Oxon Hill, MD.
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mdgovpics/">Government of Maryland</a> / Flickr

Ellison Report, 2.19.17: K-12 Dilemmas; Does Trump Have a Foreign Policy?

Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Local designer Carlous Palmer.
Stacia Brown / The Rise of Charm City

Dressed and Highly Favored: a Bonus Episode from Rise of Charm City

Dressed and Highly Favored provides listeners with a brief window into Black Baltimore's history of fashion merchandising and design.

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Ali Post / Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Episode Twelve: Glow in the Park

Mawish Raza / Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Episode Eleven: The Rise of Charm City — Live!

NPR News

Yesterday, as protesters near the Dakota Access Pipeline — who settled in the area for months as part of a protracted demonstration against the construction of an oil distribution network that they worried would taint the water supply of the Standing Rock Sioux — began to break down their shelters and leave the area, Brooklyn singer Holly Miranda released a song, a cover of an obscure late-'70s science-fictional folk song, that she'd been working on for two months in support of those leaving.

Last November, helium balloons with pictures of the bridal family floated over Bangalore Palace in southern India, welcoming some 50,000 guests to a $75 million wedding.

What's in a name? A lot, according to a new study from researchers at Ryerson University and the University of Toronto. The study found that job applicants with Asian names — names of Indian, Pakistani, or Chinese origin — were 28 percent less likely to get called for an interview compared to applicants with Anglo names, even when all the qualifications were the same.

Buried somewhere in the fathoms of YouTube is a recent clip of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, apparently filmed with a smartphone in Santiago de Cuba. The band, synonymous with the ebullient spirit of New Orleans, is playing a staple of its book, Professor Longhair's "Go to the Mardi Gras." What's notable about this version of the song, from December of 2015, is the punchy assist provided by some Cuban percussionists, who fall right into step with its second-line groove.

Bad stand-up comedy is, for everyone involved, a special kind of hell. There's really nothing worse than the awkwardness that ensues when a comic bombs in front of a restive audience at an open-mic night, half of whom have been dragged there against their will in the first place. Great comedians have made enduring art and even changed society; all bad comedians have ever done is made people hurry out of a bar with their gin-and-tonics half finished.

If you've found yourself with little taste for sniping in recent days and a serious thirst for entertainment that's satisfying and warm, you're not alone. I've heard this from an awful lot of folks in the last couple of months. And while there are lots of places to go to find what you're looking for if this is the headspace you're in, one place is the terrific Charleston season of Top Chef that's about to wrap up. The penultimate episode is Thursday night, and the finale is in a week.

Days after expanding the fight for of Mosul, Iraq's security forces are pushing further into the strategic city's western portion, focusing on its airport. Thousands of ISIS fighters are believed to be in Mosul, the extremist group's biggest stronghold in Iraq.

From Erbil, Iraq, NPR's Alice Fordham reports for our Newscast unit:

With a nudge of its robotic arm, astronauts aboard the International Space Station captured a space capsule carrying 5,500 pounds of cargo early Thursday.

"Capture confirmed," NASA TV's announcer stated at 5:44 a.m. ET. The capture took place as the space station and the capsule flew in orbit 250 miles off of Australia's northwest coast.

I got carsick reading Stephen O'Shea's The Alps, much of which involves navigating one "neurotic noodle of a road" after another as he twists his way up and down mountains in pursuit of the highs and lows of Alpine history. Reading about his umpteenth hairpin turn, I found myself whining, "Are we almost there?"

For nearly a century, people have reported mysterious epidemics of permanent paralysis in rural regions of Africa. In 1990, Hans Rosling a Swedish epidemiologist and pop-star statistician, who died of pancreatic cancer earlier this month, linked the malady to cyanide in the staple crop, cassava.

Pages

Jazz Master of the Month

Jazz Master of the Month: Nancy Wilson

With more than s ixty years in the music business, over seventy albums, and three Grammys, 79-year-old singer self-described “song stylist” Nancy Wilson still holds an audience in the palm of her hand when she sings.

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Watch: The Bassman Sits Down with Vocalist Gregory Porter

The Bassman sits down with Grammy Award winning vocalist Gregory Porter in a intimate conversation about his life and music.

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February CD: Reverence

The latest CD of famed Grammy award-winning Composer and Bassist Nathan East has arrived. Reverence is the follow-up to his long awaited self-titled debut CD.

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Coalition of day laborers and allies protesting  Ron's Temp Staffing violations of the Day Labor Service Act in 2006.
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagojwj/">Carlos Fernandez</a> / Flickr

We Don't Need a "Temporary Economy." We Need a Responsible Job Creation Act Now

All of us are feeling it. We see it happening every day. While representing constituents in Illinois’ 103 rd district, I watch the tragedy of an entire state losing good, blue collar jobs on a constant basis.

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In the Community

February Community Cares: The Dream Academy Inc.

The Dream Academy Inc. works with children of the incarcerated who have faced tremendous obstacles in their lives, including poverty and low-performing schools. The goal is to provide committed, caring adults who can make a difference and help children fix these gaps, and find self-esteem and direction in their young lives.

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WEAA Featured on Medium.com's List of 8 Music Stations to Hear in 2017

NFCB Membership Program Director Ernesto Aguilar included WEAA in an article about the 8 music stations to hear in 2017, published on Medium.com.

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Remembering WEAA's First Day of Broadcasting: January 10, 1977

WEAA first began broadcasting on January 10, 1977. For the station's 40th anniversary, read the story of WEAA's first year, as told in a 1977 issue of Morgan Magazine.

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