Local News

Batlimore Police arrested Kwame Rose yesterday outside of the Circuit Courthouse where the Freddie Gray hearings were beginning.
@jefe_north / / Twitter

News Wrap: Gray Officers Will Have Separate Trials; Activist Arrested Outside of Courthouse

During the motions hearing yesterday, Judge Barry Williams said that the six officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray will have separate trials. Williams also refused to toss out the charges against the officers, and denied a motion to remove State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby's entire office from the case. Next week, Williams will decide whether the trials will be moved out of Baltimore.
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This Week on WEAA

Protests outside of the Freddie Gray pre-trial hearing.
Roberto Alejandro / WEAA News

First Edition Sept 2: First Day of Freddie Gray Hearings; Thoughts on Mayor SRB's Interview

Sean Yoes discusses the pre-trial hearing for the Freddie Gray case and the protesting that took place outside of the courthouse with Deray Mckesson of the Black Lives Matter movement, Roberto Alejandro of The AFRO American Newspaper, and Sheryl Wood, legal analyst and founder of The Wood Law Firm.
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NPR News

In what was an emotional and contentious scene at the Rowan County, Ky., Courthouse this morning, one dramatic legal standoff came to an end when a gay couple was issued a marriage license.

James Yates and William Smith, who had tried this five times before, arrived at the courthouse just as the sun started peeking out from under the mountains on the horizon.

They walked past protesters — some condemning them and some cheering them — and entered the clerk's office.

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

The Labor Department says the U.S. economy added 173,000 jobs in August, a figure that fell short of expectations but nonetheless appeared to shrug off turmoil in overseas markets, particularly China.

In a separate survey, the department's Bureau of Labor Statistics said the unemployment rate had dipped to 5.1 percent — a seven-year low.

Updated at 9:35 a.m. ET

Here are the latest developments in the migrant crisis in Europe:

In 2008, Conrad Anker, Jimmy Chin and Renan Ozturk attempted to summit Meru, a 21,000-foot mountain in the Garhwal Himalayas in northern India. Some of the greatest climbers in the world have tried and failed to reach its peak — a sheer granite wall known as the Shark's Fin.

"The Shark's Fin to a climber is really irresistible," Chin explains to NPR's David Greene. "What really makes it challenging is that you have this kind of big wall on top of basically 4,000 feet of alpine climbing."

Saudi Arabia's new king is at the White House on Friday and Iran is expected to be high on the agenda. The Obama administration has been trying to reassure Gulf Arab allies that a nuclear deal with Iran doesn't mean that the U.S. will turn away from its other concerns about Iranian activities in the Middle East. To prove that, the U.S. is stepping up military sales to Saudi Arabia.

On the way to his son's baseball game on Long Island, sports writer J.R. Gamble tells me that his son, J.C., is quite a ball player.

"I have a lot of clips and highlights that I show people of him doing amazing things — jumping over catches, hitting balls right-handed, hitting balls left-handed," Gamble says.

Part of the reason his son is so good at baseball, Gamble explains, is that he started at an early age — a very early age.

There's a special significance to the monthly jobs report that will be released Friday morning. It could tip the balance for the Federal Reserve. Policymakers are weighing whether to raise the Fed's official interest rates later this month. It's something the Fed hasn't done since before the Great Recession.

Surveys of economists are predicting that job growth in August will be right around the current trend of about 220,000 new jobs a month, and they think the unemployment rate will tick down a notch to 5.2 percent.

The photographs of 3-year-old Aylan Kurdi, his lifeless body washed up onto a Turkish beach, forced the current refugee crisis onto front pages, home pages and Facebook feeds across the world this week.

"The image resonates personally before it resonates professionally," David Miliband, president of the International Rescue Committee, and the former British foreign minister, told NPR. "Anyone's who got children can't help but think of the worst for the moment."

In a new sign that Iran might consider freeing Jason Rezaian, a powerful Iranian politician tells NPR that there are "practical" ways to liberate the Washington Post reporter and other American prisoners. He then sketched the outline of a trade.

"That's one way," Ali Larijani, the speaker of Iran's Parliament, tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.

The Justice Department says it will beef up legal requirements for using cell-site simulators, an increasingly controversial form of surveillance technology that secretly gathers data about mobile devices.

Under the new policy, federal investigators will be required to get a warrant from a judge demonstrating probable cause, in most domestic criminal probes. Agents will need to explain to judges how the technology is being used. And they'll be directed to destroy volumes of bystanders' data "no less than once daily."

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Music News

The Mighty Sound of Maryland traveled to New Orleans to help Habitat for Humanity construct new homes for musicians displaced by the storm, working with Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick, Jr.
Chris Ammann, Baltimore Examiner. 2007. / Flickr

Recommended Reading from the Bassman: Jazz in New Orleans, 10 Years After Katrina

Marcellus Shepard, Program/Music Director and host of "In the Groove," recommends a few reading materials about the role of jazz in the recovery of New Orleans.
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September CD: Lizz Wright's "Freedom & Surrender"

Here’s a vocalist that I fell in love with the very first time I heard her music. My love for her sound was deepened when she came into the WEAA studios nearly 10 years ago and sang live for me in studio. It was the most beautiful performance I’d ever witnessed up close and personal. Her name is Lizz Wright.
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Jazz Master of the Month: Gene Harris

Born in 1933 in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Gene Harris began teaching himself piano when he was nine years old. Admiring the playing style of pianist Oscar Peterson, Harris started touring and leading his own bands immediately after leaving the military service in 1954.
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Jeff Bradshaw performing in July.
Jeff Bradshaw / / facebook

Listen to Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend

Hosts Robert Shahid and Mykel Hunter interview jazz trombonist Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend.
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Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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