This Week on WEAA

D. Watkins, author of The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America.
@AaronMMaybin / / Twitter

First Edition Sept 3: Living and Dying While Black in America

D. Watkins, author of The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America, joins Sean Yoes to talk about politics, race, education, and more.
Read More

NPR News

Supporters of Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who was jailed after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, are planning a demonstration to voice their opposition to her incarceration.

"The Kim Davis Jailhouse Prayer Rally" is set to begin at 11 a.m. today at the Carter County Detention Center. An announcement for the rally, published by Christian News Wire, contends that Davis "is obeying the laws of Kentucky while refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex [couples]."

At first it seems lively outside on the weekend in Baghdad — the lights are bright in open-air cafes, music streams from beribboned cars in a wedding party and at Ali Hussein's juice stand, decorated with plastic bananas, they're squeezing oranges on old brass presses.

But even as Hussein offers me a sharp, fresh juice, he's downcast. When I ask about the subject on everyone's mind here — the migrant flood into Europe — he laughs. "We were just talking about this!" he says. Several of his friends just passed by to say farewell.

We recorded the show in Louisville, Ky., this week — where Edward Lee is the chef and owner of the restaurant 610 Magnolia. (He says he moved to Louisville from Brooklyn in search of bourbon.) Lee has appeared on Iron Chef America, Top Chef and Mind of a Chef, and he is the author of Smoke & Pickles: Recipes and Stories from a New Southern Kitchen.

Louisville is the capital of horse racing, so we've invited Lee to play a game called "It's just like horse racing, if you pretend they're tiny horses." Three questions about dog racing.

Congress Faces A Crazy-Busy September

2 hours ago
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

More than four years after the 7,400 residents of the Japanese town of Naraha were evacuated after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant melted down in the wake of a devastating tsunami, the government is allowing people to return.

Following several years of decontamination, Naraha is the first town in the area to allow residents to return. It was evacuated in March 2011 after the Fukushima plant was smashed by the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami near Sendai, setting off the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

Running for president is expensive and exhausting — but this year, some 22 people seem to think it's a good idea. There are five major candidates for the Democratic nomination and a whopping 17 on the Republican side.

But why? As it turns out, there are many reasons.

They Think They Have A Real Chance

German police say that about 450 migrants from Hungary have arrived at a train station in Munich after German Chancellor Angela Merkel said her country would not limit the number of asylum seekers allowed in.

An estimated 4,000 people arrived in Austria, many en route to Germany, after the Hungarian government blocked them from leaving the country by train earlier this week.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Music News

The Mighty Sound of Maryland traveled to New Orleans to help Habitat for Humanity construct new homes for musicians displaced by the storm, working with Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick, Jr.
Chris Ammann, Baltimore Examiner. 2007. / Flickr

Recommended Reading from the Bassman: Jazz in New Orleans, 10 Years After Katrina

Marcellus Shepard, Program/Music Director and host of "In the Groove," recommends a few reading materials about the role of jazz in the recovery of New Orleans.
Read More

September CD: Lizz Wright's "Freedom & Surrender"

Here’s a vocalist that I fell in love with the very first time I heard her music. My love for her sound was deepened when she came into the WEAA studios nearly 10 years ago and sang live for me in studio. It was the most beautiful performance I’d ever witnessed up close and personal. Her name is Lizz Wright.
Read More

Jazz Master of the Month: Gene Harris

Born in 1933 in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Gene Harris began teaching himself piano when he was nine years old. Admiring the playing style of pianist Oscar Peterson, Harris started touring and leading his own bands immediately after leaving the military service in 1954.
Read More
Jeff Bradshaw performing in July.
Jeff Bradshaw / / facebook

Listen to Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend

Hosts Robert Shahid and Mykel Hunter interview jazz trombonist Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend.
Read More
Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
Read More

Listen Live

Now Playing

WEAA 88.9 FM

88 Days of Summer

Jazzy Summer Nights

Trombonist Jeff Bradshaw Opens Return of Series