This Week on WEAA

Senator Elizabeth Warren speaking at the Kennedy Institute on Sunday.
Kennedy Institute / / Twitter

First Edition Sept 30: Sen. Warren Speaks in Support of Black Lives Matter; Gray Hearings Continue

Some believe that Senator Elizabeth Warren’s recent speech represented the strongest public support of the Black Lives Matter Movement by any U.S. politician to date. What does the speech mean for the 2016 race for Democratic nomination?
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NPR News

Good Gourd! What's With All The Weird-Looking Squash?

7 minutes ago

When Virginia farmer Charles Martin first got into the pumpkin game a decade ago, he started small, with a half-acre plot of traditional round, orange jack-o-lanterns. Today he grows 55 varieties of gourds, squash and pumpkins, and he's always looking for something new.

We often feature musicians who make cover albums — their versions of songs made popular by others. Now comes a project where writers — some of the most acclaimed of our time — cover Shakepeare's works, retelling the Bard in their own words. Jeanette Winterson's new novel, The Gap of Time, is a re-imagining of The Winter's Tale, and it's the first book in the series to be published.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Patti Smith is a survivor whose dreams prod her to "redeem the lost" by writing about them with "some sliver of personal revelation." In Just Kids, her 2010 National Book Award-winning memoir about her relationship with Robert Mapplethorpe, she rued the loss of so many friends and colleagues to drugs, suicide, cancer, AIDS and "misadventure." (Mapplethorpe, whom she memorably called "the blue star in the constellation of my personal cosmology," succumbed to AIDS in 1989.)

If your company hasn't launched a wellness program, this might be the year.

As benefits enrollment for 2016 approaches, more employers than ever are expected to nudge workers toward plans that screen them for risks, monitor their activity and encourage them to take the right pills, food and exercise.

What It's Like To Take Photos Of A Dying Man

2 hours ago

For more than 10 years, disease had slowly eaten away at He Quangui's lungs, leaving him, for the most part, bedridden.

But Quangui was no smoker — he was a Chinese gold miner. Quangui was stricken with silicosis, a respiratory illness caused by inhaling silica dust. An estimated 6 million Chinese miners suffer from the debilitating disease pneumoconiosis — of which silicosis is one form.

The news of John Boehner's resignation as Speaker of the House has many wondering what comes next in such a deeply divided Congress.

NPR's Rachel Martin spoke with House Democratic Leader and former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi about the role of the speaker and her take on the current climate of the House. She said it has a full agenda and that it can "be one that is a successful path to the future or it can be a calendar of chaos, and that really is up to the Republicans."

Interview Highlights

On current climate of the House

When the Berlin Wall fell in November 1989, Kani Alavi was a young artist living in an apartment overlooking the border between East and West Berlin. He remembers seeing East Berliners streaming through "like a wave of water," he said through an interpreter. "Some were joyful, some were doubtful, some were afraid they might not [have the chance to] cross again."

Alavi painted that moment: a flowing river of faces he calls "Es geschah im November," or "It happened in November."


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Music News

Wilton Felder on his album Gentle Fire (1983)
Wilton Felder / MCA Records

The Baltimore Blend Remembers the Late Wilton Felder

Wilton Felder passed away on September 27th. He was the last surviving member of the original Jazz Crusaders.
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Mike Nyce / WEAA

Hip-Hop Chronicles Opens Up Dialogue on Climate Change

The Hip-Hop Chronicles hosted an Act on Climate Town Hall Broadcast moderated by Civ Jones.
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Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Fiesta Musical

National Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 - October 15. Guillermo Brown, host of Fiesta Musical, explains the month and invites listeners to join him to celebrate.
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WEAA 88.9 FM

Anthony McCarthy spoke at the Ascertainment Breakfast.
Kim Chase / / WEAA News

Watch Highlights from WEAA's Ascertainment Breakfast

Video highlights of WEAA's Community Ascertainment breakfast, which took place on August 27 at the James E. Lewis Museum of Art on Morgan State campus.
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September CD: Lizz Wright's "Freedom & Surrender"

Here’s a vocalist that I fell in love with the very first time I heard her music. My love for her sound was deepened when she came into the WEAA studios nearly 10 years ago and sang live for me in studio. It was the most beautiful performance I’d ever witnessed up close and personal. Her name is Lizz Wright.
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Jazz Master of the Month: Gene Harris

Born in 1933 in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Gene Harris began teaching himself piano when he was nine years old. Admiring the playing style of pianist Oscar Peterson, Harris started touring and leading his own bands immediately after leaving the military service in 1954.
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Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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88 Days of Summer

Jazzy Summer Nights

Trombonist Jeff Bradshaw Opens Return of Series