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Local News with WEAA's Julius White

Julius White has the local news: Baltimore mayoral candidates Catherine Pugh, Alan Walden, and Joshua Harris met last night for a candidate forum, where they tackled topics such as police reform and transportation improvement. The Baltimore County Police department has released the name of a police officer, Sgt. Bortner, who shot and killed a police robbery suspect last week.
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This Week on WEAA

IIP Photo Archive / Flickr

First Edition Sept 27: A Review of Monday's Presidential Debate

First Edition host Sean Yoes reviews Monday night’s historic first debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Yoes speaks with Eddie Glaude, Jr., chair of the Center for African-American Studies and the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African-American Studies at Princeton University.
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NPR News

In the summer of 1936, a plain and sturdy farm woman from southern Minnesota traveled to New York to meet the mayor, stay at the Waldorf, dine at the Stork Club and make headlines in every major newspaper.

That woman was Susan Eisele, my grandmother, who Country Home magazine selected — out of 4,000 entrants — as its "Rural Correspondent of the Year."

The award came with a $200 prize and a two-week trip to New York and Washington.

Soap opera pioneer Agnes Nixon, who created All My Children and One Life to Live, has died at the age of 93. She is known for highlighted challenging and taboo social issues through daytime television.

Her son Bob Nixon told The Associated Press that she died at a physical rehabilitation facility in Haverford, Pa.

California's state treasurer has announced he is suspending major parts of the state's business relationship with Wells Fargo because of a scandal involving unauthorized customer accounts.

In a letter to Wells Fargo, John Chiang asked, "how can I continue to entrust the public's money to an organization which has shown such little regard for the legions of Californians who have placed their well-being in its care?"

Artificial intelligence is one of those tech terms that seems to inevitably conjure up images (and jokes) of computer overlords running sci-fi dystopias — or, more recently, robots taking over human jobs.

But AI is already here: It's powering your voice-activated digital personal assistants and Web searches, guiding automated features on your car and translating foreign texts, detecting your friends in photos you post on social media and filtering your spam.

A new study of violent behavior in more than 1,000 mammal species found the meerkat is the mammal most likely to be murdered by one of its own kind.

The study, led by José María Gómez of the University of Grenada in Spain and published Wednesday in the journal Nature, analyzed more than 4 million deaths among 1,024 mammal species and compared them with findings in 600 studies of violence among humans from ancient times until today.

The findings tell us two things:

Life changed as Sadiik Yusuf knew it about two years ago, when the FBI appeared at his front door in Minneapolis to tell him his son Abdullahi had been stopped at the airport, suspected of trying to board a flight that would take him to Syria to fight with ISIS.

It's believed to be a first — and it certainly came as a surprise: Ancient Roman coins have been found in the ruins of a castle in Okinawa, Japan, that dates to the 12th and 15th centuries. The copper coins were found in 2013; X-ray analysis shows that they bear an image of Constantine the Great.

On Tuesday, after a less-than-stellar debate performance, Donald Trump returned to using one of his favorite measurements to mask his missteps on Monday night — the polls.

U.S Secretary of Defense Ash Carter said the U.S. has agreed to send an additional 600 troops to Iraq, in anticipation of the major upcoming operation to retake the Islamic State-held city of Mosul.

These additional troops "will increase the number of U.S. forces in Iraq to around 5,000," NPR's Tom Bowman told our Newscast unit. American troop levels in Iraq peaked at 170,000 in November 2007.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Marcellus Shepard / WEAA-fm

WEAA's Marcellus Shepard Attends the Curacao North Sea Jazz Festival

I had the pleasure of being on the island of Curacao for the 7th annual Curacao North Sea Jazz Festival. I was able to experience the island through a few excursions and brought it’s food, history and culture back to the United States via my live broadcast from the island. What a beautiful place with incredible people. Please enjoy these clips and pictures from the exquisite island of Curacao!
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In the Community

September Community Cares: The Henrietta Lacks Legacy Group

The Henrietta Lacks Legacy Group invites you to support the creation of the wax figure of Henrietta Lacks for the National Great Black in Wax Museum.
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Attention Caterers!

WEAA is looking for local catering donations for our upcoming special events.

Watch: Vibraphonist Warren Wolf Sits Down With the Bassman

Checkout the Bassman on the Cool Jazz Countdown as he sits down with vibraphonist Warren Wolf about his latest CD, Convergence.
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