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City Leaders Set Up "War Room" To Combat Crime

City leaders are establishing a new system to help tackle crime following another bloody weekend. A "War Room" is being set up to help with collaborative efforts between local and federal agencies. The around-the-clock system will help address the spike in violent crime in Baltimore since the death of Freddie Gray. Officials including Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Interim Police Commissioner Kevin Davis held a press conference Sunday to announce the effort. “We need to just...
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NPR News

In a tragic accident that has left a Kansas community in mourning, a bat boy hit in the head by a player taking practice swings Saturday has died of his injuries. Kaiser Carlile, 9, was a well-loved part of the Liberal Bee Jays, a summer league team for college players.

Photos of Carlile show him as a freckle-faced boy: hustling around the field, sitting in the dugout and talking with the players. But during his team's National Baseball Congress World Series game Saturday in Wichita, he was hit in the head by a bat as he ran past the on-deck circle after an out.

When the renowned radio personality and Grand Ole Opry fixture Bill Cody walked onto the stage at the Ryman Auditorioum to welcome Dolly Parton there for the first time in twelve years, he called her "the most beloved artist of all time." Then he quickly, almost imperceptibly, corrected himself, adding a qualifier: female artist." Who knows what flashed in Cody's mind in that moment — perhaps the face of Johnny Cash, the patron

Five weeks after an economic crisis forced its closure, Greece's stock market reopened to a flurry of selling and falling prices Monday. Banks led the losses on the Athens Stock Exchange, which is also coping with poor manufacturing data.

When it opened, the Athens Stock Exchange General Index plummeted from 797.52 down to a new 52-week low of 615 — a drop of nearly 23 percent. But the index then recovered some ground, rising to 660 (a 17 percent drop) some three hours after trading began.

From Athens, NPR's Joanna Kakissis reports:

'Spies' Is A Cinematic Account Of Americans In War-Torn Paris

2 hours ago

It's the least surprising thing in the world to discover that historian Alex Kershaw's latest book, Avenue of Spies, has already been optioned for development with Sony Pictures TV. Its circumstances — an American family in Paris aiding the French resistance from an apartment only a few doors down from the Paris headquarters of the SS — are too cinematic to ignore. And if that sounds like a coincidence so precarious only fiction can support it ... it sounded that way to the Jacksons, too.

The inaugural 2016 debate for the White House on Thursday will be the first time many voters will be tuning into the volatile GOP campaign, and candidates are praying they'll get a boost and not a bust from the face-off.

"The level of engagement has been very low," said Rick Wilson, a Florida-based national GOP strategist. "This will be a week where we will probably have record viewership on FOX News for a primary debate, and it's going to get a lot of attention and a lot of focus."

Eight months ago, Mexico's first lady, known for her fondness of designer clothes and European vacations, made a public promise to sell a multi-million-dollar mansion bought under controversial circumstances. She's purchasing the home, at below market rates, from a contractor with lucrative connections to her husband.

The scandal has been one of the biggest to rock the president's administration. And months later many questions remain regarding the questionable purchase — and the first lady hasn't sold her house.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

As Martin O'Malley neared the launch of his presidential campaign, the former Baltimore mayor and Maryland governor said he wouldn't think of announcing his bid "anyplace else," even as the city exploded with riots after the death of Freddie Gray, a young black man who was fatally injured while in police custody.

In 1953, Dr. John Clements realized something fundamental about the way the lung functions — an insight that would ultimately save the lives of millions of premature babies.

The story begins in 1950, when the U.S. Army sent Clements, a newly graduated physician, to the medical division of what was then called the Army Chemical Center in Edgewood, Md. Clements was interested in doing research in biochemistry. His commanding officer was of a different mind.

The flooded streets and destroyed homes of the New Orleans neighborhood known as the Lower Ninth Ward were among the most powerful and iconic images from Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath 10 years ago.

Now, much of New Orleans is back — more than half of the city's neighborhoods have recovered some 90 percent of their pre-storm population.

That's not the case for the Lower Ninth.

Today, there's a feeling of desolation on nearly every block of the predominantly African-American neighborhood.

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Music News

July CD: Bob Baldwin's "MelloWonder"

There have been countless tribute albums to the 8th Wonder of the World, Stevie Wonder, over the years. However, when it comes to contemporary jazz, outside of Najee’s Songs From the Key of Life, none come close to the brand new release from one of the genre’s top selling artists, Bob Baldwin, who presents MelloWonder, Songs in the Key of Stevie. Baldwin says he’s wanted to do this album for the last 15 years and put the wheels in motion for the project about two years ago. He presents a...
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