This Week on WEAA

First Edition Feb 21: HBCU Coalition Court Proceedings; Dr. Whitehead on Teaching Black History

On the final day of the court proceedings connected to the HBCU Coalition lawsuit against the state of Maryland, First Edition host Sean Yoes gets a report from AFRO reporter Deborah Bailey.

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Barnaby Manor Elementary School Visit by Jay Baker at Oxon Hill, MD.
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mdgovpics/">Government of Maryland</a> / Flickr

Ellison Report, 2.19.17: K-12 Dilemmas; Does Trump Have a Foreign Policy?

Andre Chung / NBC News

Listen Up! Feb 17

Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Local designer Carlous Palmer.
Stacia Brown / The Rise of Charm City

Dressed and Highly Favored: a Bonus Episode from Rise of Charm City

Dressed and Highly Favored provides listeners with a brief window into Black Baltimore's history of fashion merchandising and design.

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Ali Post / Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Episode Twelve: Glow in the Park

Mawish Raza / Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Episode Eleven: The Rise of Charm City — Live!

NPR News

Early Wednesday morning, a space capsule carrying 5,500 pounds of cargo approached the International Space Station.

This year, the Paris museum that looks like a jumble of giant, colored pipes with an escalator in a clear plastic tube zigzagging up its side turns 40.

Nowadays, that museum — the Pompidou Center — has a secure place in the heart of Paris and in Parisians' hearts. But it wasn't always the case.

Dozens of not-for-profit organizations have formed in the past decade to promote free or low-cost heart screenings for teens. The groups often claim such tests save lives by finding abnormalities that might pose a risk of sudden cardiac death.

GOP Considers Trimming Health Law's 10 Essential Benefits

2 hours ago

As Republicans look at ways to replace or repair the Affordable Care Act, many suggest that shrinking the list of services that insurers are required to offer in individual and small group plans would reduce costs and increase flexibility.

Filmmaker Seijun Suzuki, whose blend of pop-art, noir crime and peculiar cool is credited with inspiring directors from John Woo and Quentin Tarantino to Jim Jarmusch, has died. These days, Suzuki's Branded to Kill is widely seen as a masterpiece; when he made the absurdist thriller in 1967, he was fired from Nikkatsu studios.

There are very few scenarios where I could see myself considering the flesh of a fellow human being as food, and the ultimatum "eat today or die tomorrow" comes up in all of them. Most people are probably with me on this.

But Bill Schutt's newest book, Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History, reveals that from a scientific perspective, there's a predictable calculus for when humans and animals go cannibal. And far more humans — and animals — have dipped into the world of cannibalism than you might have imagined.

Every day on his way to class, Terrence Johnson walks by a bronze statue and thinks about history. The statue depicts James Meredith, who in 1962 became the first African-American to enroll at the University of Mississippi.

"He transcended so much," says Johnson, a junior. "The fact that he had the will to integrate a university like this in Mississippi that has such a rich and chaotic history ... that will always be with me."

Dirty Projectors frontman David Longstreth decided he couldn't wait any longer.

More than 40 years after penning his biggest hit, Don Bryant is back in the game. Bryant — who sang in a gospel quartet before linking up with R&B bandleader Willie Mitchell and becoming a go-to songwriter at Memphis' Hi Records — might be best known for writing the 1973 slow-cooker "I Can't Stand The Rain" with singer Ann Peebles, whom he married shortly afterward. Now, at 74, he's preparing to release a new album of original songs, Don't Give Up On Love.

Malaysian investigators want to talk with a senior North Korean diplomat in connection to the poisoning death of Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The development comes as the North Korean Embassy in Kuala Lampur insists no poison was used.

Pages

Jazz Master of the Month

Jazz Master of the Month: Nancy Wilson

With more than s ixty years in the music business, over seventy albums, and three Grammys, 79-year-old singer self-described “song stylist” Nancy Wilson still holds an audience in the palm of her hand when she sings.

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Watch: The Bassman Sits Down with Vocalist Gregory Porter

The Bassman sits down with Grammy Award winning vocalist Gregory Porter in a intimate conversation about his life and music.

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February CD: Reverence

The latest CD of famed Grammy award-winning Composer and Bassist Nathan East has arrived. Reverence is the follow-up to his long awaited self-titled debut CD.

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Coalition of day laborers and allies protesting  Ron's Temp Staffing violations of the Day Labor Service Act in 2006.
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagojwj/">Carlos Fernandez</a> / Flickr

We Don't Need a "Temporary Economy." We Need a Responsible Job Creation Act Now

All of us are feeling it. We see it happening every day. While representing constituents in Illinois’ 103 rd district, I watch the tragedy of an entire state losing good, blue collar jobs on a constant basis.

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In the Community

February Community Cares: The Dream Academy Inc.

The Dream Academy Inc. works with children of the incarcerated who have faced tremendous obstacles in their lives, including poverty and low-performing schools. The goal is to provide committed, caring adults who can make a difference and help children fix these gaps, and find self-esteem and direction in their young lives.

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WEAA Featured on Medium.com's List of 8 Music Stations to Hear in 2017

NFCB Membership Program Director Ernesto Aguilar included WEAA in an article about the 8 music stations to hear in 2017, published on Medium.com.

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Remembering WEAA's First Day of Broadcasting: January 10, 1977

WEAA first began broadcasting on January 10, 1977. For the station's 40th anniversary, read the story of WEAA's first year, as told in a 1977 issue of Morgan Magazine.

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