This Week on WEAA

Used to treat HIV/AIDS, the anti-retroviral drug Truvada is a combination of tenofovir and emtricitabine.
Jeffrey Beall / 2012-05-26

First Edition Oct 1: War-Ravaged Syria; New Global HIV Guidelines

Sean Yoes covers Russian military actions in Syria, and the efforts of refugees to flee the war-ravaged country. Also, Yoes discusses a series of new HIV guidelines from the World Health Organization which have the potential to impact millions of infected individuals globally — including Baltimore residents.
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NPR News

Even though President Obama has not yet released details on the Trans-Pacific Partnership announced Monday, supporters and opponents are making their voices heard – at full volume.

Business leaders and interest groups hope their impassioned pleas will sway Congress, which must vote on the proposed deal next year.

This is what the cheers sounded like:

Two scientists from Canada and Japan have won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 for opening "a new realm in particle physics," the Nobel Prize committee says. Working far apart, both Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald showed how neutrinos shift identities like chameleons in space.

Young people loved President Obama in 2008 — they turned out to support him more than any other recent Democratic presidential nominee.

But now, there's a new crop of young voters — the kids who came of age during the Obama presidency. They're are all grown up, and getting their first chance to vote for president.

They grew up in a different era — after September 11 and in the middle of the recession.

The international aid group Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières) is calling for an international investigation into what it calls a war crime in Afghanistan — Saturday's U.S. airstrikes that killed 22 people, including medical staff and patients at the organization's hospital in Kunduz.

In an interview with NPR's David Greene, Chrissie Hynde discusses her new memoir, Reckless: My Life as a Pretender. The interview touches on portions of the book that have generated some controversy, including Hynde's description of a possible sexual assault.

The best place to see Cuba's Internet explosion is along the busy Havana thoroughfare known as La Rampa, or the Ramp.

Named for its sloping descent toward the sea, it is congested and loud. Still, crowds pack the sidewalks, office alcoves and driveways here to log on. They huddle within a few blocks of huge cell towers atop the Havana Libre luxury hotel. All eyes are glued to smartphones, tablets and laptops.

Raul Cuba, 41, types a lengthy Internet access code and password into his phone. He only learned how to log on a month ago.

Anthony Marra writes about Russia like he was born there.

Actually, the 31-year-old American lived there only a semester, as a college student. "I arrived in January without knowing a lick of Russian," he tells Morning Edition host (and former Moscow correspondent) David Greene. "I just became immediately fascinated with the extremes of life, of geography, of political events that it almost seemed impossible not to want to set a story there."

More than a year after the U.S. led the formation of an anti-ISIS coalition, the extremists still hold large parts of western and northern Iraq.

In the west, ISIS took the desert provincial capital, Ramadi, four months ago. A much-anticipated counteroffensive never materialized.

In a small area of Anbar Province that ISIS doesn't control, five Iraqi flags on bent brass poles mark out a parade ground bordered by a junkyard and dilapidated warehouse.

Customers crowd into a bustling Budapest restaurant for dinner. They open their menus, expecting to read about stuffed paprikas and Hungarian goulash.

But instead they find ... Eritrean sourdough pancake bread. Afghan pie. Syrian sweets.

With the stroke of a pen, California Gov. Jerry Brown made it legal for physicians in the state to prescribe lethal doses of medications if their terminally ill patients wish to end their lives.

Brown signed the "End of Life Act" into law on Monday, and in doing so California joins four other states — Oregon, Washington, Vermont and Montana — where patients' right to choose doctor-assisted death is protected either by law or court order.


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Music News

Wilton Felder on his album Gentle Fire (1983)
Wilton Felder / MCA Records

The Baltimore Blend Remembers the Late Wilton Felder

Wilton Felder passed away on September 27th. He was the last surviving member of the original Jazz Crusaders.
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Mike Nyce / WEAA

Hip-Hop Chronicles Opens Up Dialogue on Climate Change

The Hip-Hop Chronicles hosted an Act on Climate Town Hall Broadcast moderated by Civ Jones.
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Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Fiesta Musical

National Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 - October 15. Guillermo Brown, host of Fiesta Musical, explains the month and invites listeners to join him to celebrate.
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WEAA 88.9 FM

Anthony McCarthy spoke at the Ascertainment Breakfast.
Kim Chase / / WEAA News

Watch Highlights from WEAA's Ascertainment Breakfast

Video highlights of WEAA's Community Ascertainment breakfast, which took place on August 27 at the James E. Lewis Museum of Art on Morgan State campus.
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September CD: Lizz Wright's "Freedom & Surrender"

Here’s a vocalist that I fell in love with the very first time I heard her music. My love for her sound was deepened when she came into the WEAA studios nearly 10 years ago and sang live for me in studio. It was the most beautiful performance I’d ever witnessed up close and personal. Her name is Lizz Wright.
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Jazz Master of the Month: Gene Harris

Born in 1933 in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Gene Harris began teaching himself piano when he was nine years old. Admiring the playing style of pianist Oscar Peterson, Harris started touring and leading his own bands immediately after leaving the military service in 1954.
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Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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88 Days of Summer

Jazzy Summer Nights

Trombonist Jeff Bradshaw Opens Return of Series