Robert Dear, suspect in the Planned Parenthood shooting.
Colorado Springs Police Dept.

First Edition Nov 30: CO Planned Parenthood Shooting; Day One of William Porter's Trial

Is the inflammatory rhetoric of the GOP’s Conservative right wing partly to blame for the recent shooting at a Colorado Planned Parenthood clinic? Sean Yoes talks national politics with commentators Catalina Byrd and Sean Breeze. Plus, legal analysis of the first day of Officer William Porter’s trial, one of the six officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray.
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Jenna Weiss-Berman, director of audio at Buzzfeed, says Fugitive Waves, produced by Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, offers a gorgeous and complete soundscape. "When you're listening to the Kitchen Sisters, you never hear a host or a narrator, you really just hear the people whose stories are being told," she says. Click here to listen to "The French Manicure," Weiss-Berman's favorite episode.

It's dangerous to practice medicine in Syria.

When I called up a physician based in the city of Aleppo, he said he'd have to call me back — there had just been a missile strike. And Doctors Without Borders has released a statement saying that one of its hospitals in Homs was partially destroyed in a bombing on Saturday.

A mosquito-borne virus that has made its way to the U.S. may be causing more serious symptoms than first thought.

Chikungunya starts with fevers and aches, like malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases. What distinguishes the virus is that is also brings with it debilitating joint pain. The pain usually dwindles over the course of a few weeks, though it can leave some people with chronic arthritis.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



International leaders gathering in Paris to address global warming face increasing pressure to tackle the issue of "climate refugees." Some island nations are already looking to move their people to higher ground, even purchasing land elsewhere in preparation.

In the U.S. Northwest, sea level rise is forcing a Native American tribe to consider abandoning lands it has inhabited for thousands of years.

The business community is well-represented at the United Nations climate summit underway in Paris — and it will be much more engaged in finding positive solutions than ever before.

It's a far cry from the first large-scale U.N. conference to address climate change, which took place in Rio de Janeiro in 1992.

In the past, in fact, business often was an obstacle to action on climate change and seen more as an enemy than a partner.

Craig Ferris begins his morning with an unscheduled stop in his black suburban.

"I usually have to come get these guys at least once a week," Ferris says, honking his horn.

Ferris is best known around here as the basketball coach who's led Wyoming Indian High School to four state championships. But he also works for the elementary school as what's called a 'home-school coordinator.'

The job seems to be equal parts mailman, social worker and taxi driver.

For the first time in a decade, congressional leaders have agreed on a long-term bill to fix, maintain and expand the nation's roads, bridges, rails and mass transit.

If approved by both the House and Senate and signed by President Obama, the measure would spend more than $280 billion dollars on highways and transit over the next five years.

The House is set to vote on the bill on Thursday, and the Senate votes on Friday.

How much does $1 billion buy these days? The city of Buffalo is about to find out.

New York state is funneling $1 billion in cash and tax incentives into the region. Fully half of the "Buffalo Billion," as it's known, is going to one place: a massive solar panel factory, rising on the site of a demolished steel factory in South Buffalo. With an additional $250 million from other state sources, the solar project is getting a total of $750 million from New York.


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Thursday Morning Jam Session: Remembering Arnold Sterling

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November CD: Spur of the Moment's "N2 Deep"

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