Local News

Protests this morning outside of the Freddie Gray pre-trial hearing.
Roberto Alejandro

News Wrap: Gray Trial Begins; Mikulski Backs Iran Deal

Charges against six Baltimore police officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray were upheld during a pre-trial hearing.
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This Week on WEAA

Dr. Gregory Thornton, CEO of Baltimore City Schools, visits Matthew A. Henson Elementary for the first day of school.
Baltimore City Public Schools / / Twitter

First Edition Sept 1: The State of Baltimore Public Schools; Interview with Mayor Rawlings-Blake

As public schools open their doors officially, education experts join Sean Yoes for a round table discussion on engaging students of color in school, the state teachers union lobbying against standardized testing, and the 100+ teacher vacancies that remain in Baltimore public schools as the year begins. Then, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake comes to the WEAA studios to talk with Yoes about topics ranging from law enforcement to education. Listen to the full interview here. And finally, a...
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NPR News

Only a tiny fraction of the growing number of people with health savings accounts invests the money in their accounts in the financial markets, a recent study finds. The vast majority leave their contributions in savings accounts instead where the money may earn lower returns.

Amid a corruption scandal that has been punctuated by daily protests in the country, Guatemala's President Otto Pérez Molina has resigned.

In a letter presented to Congress at 11:58 p.m. on Wednesday, Pérez Molina said he was resigning "in the interest of the country."

Just hours earlier, the country's Congress had voted to strip Pérez Molina of his immunity. The country's public prosecutor said on Twitter that the former president has been charged and an arrest warrant has been issued.

Now that 34 senators have committed to support President Obama on the Iran nuclear agreement, that deal looks certain to survive the opposition of Republicans in Congress.

But Congress still faces an ugly September and fall, as other crises await members returning from five weeks of vacation, namely:

  • A potential government shutdown
  • Once again hitting the debt ceiling
  • The highway fund running out of money
  • A lapse in authority for the Export-Import Bank

There are several ways in which Zen Cho's Sorcerer to the Crown invites comparison with Susanna Clarke's best-selling, BBC-adapted Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell: It features squabbling English magicians, a Regency setting, and a mysterious decline in English magic attributed at least in part to difficult relations with capricious fairies.

It's an increasingly popular move in higher education. Hundreds of schools no longer require student applicants to submit SAT or ACT scores.

In July, George Washington University became the latest school to throw its considerable weight behind the test-optional movement. Its explanation:

For some time now, Donald Trump has been attacking Jeb Bush, mostly in media appearances or on Twitter. But, over the last few weeks, Trump has been using Instagram in his fight.

Trump has been posting campaign-style short videos to his Instagram feed, attacking Bush's record of support for the Iraq War and even posting a video of Jeb's mother, Barbara Bush, urging him not to run for president:

In a series called Close Listening: Decoding Nature Through Sound, Morning Edition has been profiling scientists who explore the natural world by listening to it.

But sometimes listening isn't enough — scientists have to record animals and even talk back to them to figure out what they're saying.

White House budget director Shaun Donovan called for a "more aggressive strategy" to thwart improper government payments to doctors, hospitals and insurance companies in a previously undisclosed letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell earlier this year.

Government health care programs covering millions of Americans waste billions of tax dollars every year through these improper payments, Donovan said in the Feb. 26, 2015 letter.

Trouble Sleeping? A Composer Wants To Help

6 hours ago

British composer Max Richter spent about two years writing and recording a piece of music which, if it's successful, few people will hear in full. It's a composition called SLEEP and it runs eight hours long — the perfect length for a good night's rest. The full version of the piece will be released as a digital album Friday.

Soul singer Lizz Wright is starting over. Her new album, Freedom & Surrender, comes after a tough few years, during which she left behind a failed marriage and her own expectations about starting a family. And yet, she found a creative spark in that loss, along with a new kind of voice.

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Music News

The Mighty Sound of Maryland traveled to New Orleans to help Habitat for Humanity construct new homes for musicians displaced by the storm, working with Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick, Jr.
Chris Ammann, Baltimore Examiner. 2007. / Flickr

Recommended Reading from the Bassman: Jazz in New Orleans, 10 Years After Katrina

Marcellus Shepard, Program/Music Director and host of "In the Groove," recommends a few reading materials about the role of jazz in the recovery of New Orleans.
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Jeff Bradshaw performing in July.
Jeff Bradshaw / / facebook

Listen to Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend

Hosts Robert Shahid and Mykel Hunter interview jazz trombonist Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend.
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Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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