Thomas Jayoord

EllisonReport Nov 20: The #ParisAttack Political Map; Changing #2016 Landscape; #MinimumWage

This week’s ER examines the impact of the post-Paris attack on the political map; populist Republicanism vs. corporate Republicanism; Analysis of the Middle East battle space; the relationship between media and presidential candidates; a deeper look at the pros and cons of a minimum wage hike.
Read More

NPR News

Part of the Australian coastline popular with swimmers and surfers will now be patrolled by drones as a way to protect beachgoers from shark attacks, government officials announced Wednesday.

The trials in the southeastern state of New South Wales are part of a AU $16 million ($11.6 million) program that will test the effectiveness of drone technology in mitigating shark attacks. The drones will send real-time images of coastal waters back to an operator using GPS coordinates.

Flip through a popular children's furniture catalog and you'll find baby cribs with bumpers — a padded piece of fabric that ties around the wooden slats, making the crib look cozy and cute. The problem, researchers say, is these bumpers can be deadly, because babies can get caught in the fabric and suffocate.

A Pentagon investigation into a deadly U.S. airstrike on a Médecins Sans Frontières hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, has found the attack was the result of human error, compounded by malfunctioning computers and communication failures.

Gen. John Campbell, the commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, detailed the findings in a Pentagon briefing Wednesday. "This was a tragic and avoidable accident caused primarily by human error," he said.

The bipartisan effort to overhaul the criminal justice system for drug offenders has hit a speed bump.

Some members of Congress are trying to tie those lighter punishments for drug defendants to a new bill that the Justice Department says would make it harder to prosecute a range of crimes from food safety to business fraud.

The plan, passed by voice vote by the House Judiciary Committee to little notice last week, would require prosecutors to prove guilt to a higher standard in many cases, by default.

There's a big divide in how Republicans and Democrats are talking about terrorism — and it's one unlikely to be solved anytime soon.

Consumers seeking health policies with the most freedom in choosing doctors and hospitals are finding far fewer of those plans on the insurance marketplaces. And the premiums are rising faster than for other types of coverage.

Four days after security levels were raised over a possible terrorist attack, the Belgian capital remains on high alert — but schools, businesses and subway stations are reopening to the public.

Police and soldiers were standing guard as life in Brussels returns to something like normal, reports NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton:

Time was in America that stores routinely closed on Thanksgiving Day. People sent Thanksgiving greeting cards, people donned odd costumes and schools and communities staged elaborate parades and Thanksgiving pageants in which Native Americans and pilgrims gathered together and smiled and waved.

One of two crew members survived the shooting down of a Russian warplane by Turkey on Tuesday, Russian officials say, and was rescued by a Syrian commando unit in an operation that ended early Wednesday.

How To Talk To Kids About Thanksgiving

5 hours ago

You know the drill: Trace your hand, then add the details. Two feet, a beak, a single eyeball. Color it in, and voila! Hand becomes turkey.

You know the rest too: The Pilgrims fled England and landed on Plymouth Rock. The native people there, the Wampanoag, taught them to farm the land. In 1621, they sat down together for a thanksgiving feast, and we've been celebrating it ever since.

It's a lesson many remember from childhood, but the story has some problems.


Listen Live

Now Playing

WEAA 88.9 FM

Music News

Thursday Morning Jam Session: Remembering Arnold Sterling

The Baltimore Blend honors the life of Arnold Sterling, a Baltimore native and nationally recognized jazz saxophonist, through conversations with those he taught and loved.
Read More

November CD: Spur of the Moment's "N2 Deep"

I got excited when I heard the DC-based band Spur of the Moment was recording a new project. Spur of the Moment has been blessing us with some incredible music for the last two decades. After a hiatus from recording, they return with an incredible CD titled, “N2 Deep.”
Read More

November Community Cares Partner: Office of Student Activites

Morgan State University’s Office of Student Activities strives to foster a campus environment that promotes the total education of each student. Its primary goal is to assist individual students and student organizations in the creation, implementation and evaluation of programs that contribute to the academic growth and personal development of all students.
Read More

WEAA Launches Documentary Series: "Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City"

WEAA is proud to announce “Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City” — a new project produced by Stacia Brown and funded through AIR media.
Read More

Jazz Master of the Month: Charlie Rouse

Charlie Rouse was born in Washington D.C. in 1924, and is mostly remembered as Thelonious Monk’s featured tenor saxophonist from 1959 to 1970. His articulate solos were always full of joy, with each of his fluid phrases perfectly connected to the one before.
Read More