Local News

City Councilman Nick Mosby at the 49th Enough Is Enough Peace Rally in August.
Nick Mosby / / Instagram

News Wrap: Nick Mosby Considers Running for Mayor; More Than One Homicide a Day in August

City Councilman Nick Mosby told the Baltimore Sun on Sunday that he's "seriously considering" running for mayor. Mosby, the husband of Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, would join Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and former Mayor Sheila Dixon in the field of candidates. Mosby says being mayor is something he's wanted since he was eight years old.
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This Week on WEAA

Views of inundated areas in New Orleans following breaking of the levees surrounding the city as the result of Hurricane Katrina. New Orleans, Louisiana. September 2005.
Lieut. Commander Mark Moran, NOAA Corps / / NOAA Photo Library

First Edition Aug 28: Remembering Hurricane Katrina 10 Years Later; Law Enforcement Debate Continues

A review of the week’s top stories from the pages of the AFRO American Newspaper and reporting of Roberto Alejandro. And the Mod Squad reports on city hall and law enforcement.
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NPR News

Florida Cowboys Week: Part One

To Mary K. Herron and others, the history of black cowboys in Florida is a venerable element of the state's past.

This has been the Summer of Trump on the campaign trail. Donald Trump has flown high in the polls, with seemingly nothing emerging to slow his rise.

But as heading into September, here are three hurdles the reigning Republican front-runner might have to contend with that run counter to his success so far:

Despite a Supreme Court ruling that compelled a Rowan County clerk in Kentucky to give out marriage licenses to gay couples, Kim Davis refused to comply once again on Tuesday morning by denying marriage licenses to everyone.

Ryland Barton, a reporter for Kentucky Public Radio, reports that Davis said she made the decision "under God's authority."

Saying that he wants to emphasize mercy, Pope Francis announced that during the church's upcoming holy year, he will allow all priests to forgive women who have had abortions.

In a letter published Tuesday, Francis said he understands that some people approach abortions with "superficial awareness." But for others, it's a struggle that deserves deep reflection. The pontiff concludes:

It might seem odd to be reading about an old-fashioned farmstead shootout and thinking about how charming it is, but if you're reading Girl Waits With Gun, you might as well get used to it. You'll be thinking that a lot, because the women holding down this particular farmstead are Constance, Norma, and Fleurette Kopp, who handle the battle with grim panache. Though they're under fire, Constance's narrative voice is endlessly pragmatic and authoritative: Neither stray internal monologue nor enemy bullets will be permitted.

President Obama has slow-jammed the news on late-night TV and sat down with wacky YouTube celebrities. The show he's joining this week might just make those appearances look buttoned up and boring.

A flood of migrants, including refugees from Syria and Afghanistan, are now stranded in Budapest after the Hungarian government closed down the city's main train terminal.

Authorities had been allowing migrants to travel to Western Europe without checking passports, but on Tuesday, the station was closed and migrants began protesting.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The title tells all: Sisters in Law: How Sandra Day O'Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World. Author Linda Hirshman's joint biography of the first and second woman to serve on the nation's highest court is a gossipy, funny, sometimes infuriating and moving tale of two women so similar and yet so different.

Sandra Day O'Connor, raised on a western ranch and a life-long Republican who cut her political teeth as majority leader of the Arizona Senate, was named to the Supreme Court by President Reagan in 1981.

Stories about how Amazon and Google want to deliver packages using drones have gotten a lot of attention. But in fact, some 1,300 businesses and individuals have already received permission from the Federal Aviation Administration to use drones for commercial purposes — everything from selling real estate to inspecting utility lines. But their operators are worried that recreational drone users who have been flying their vehicles near aircraft may spoil the party.

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Music News

Jeff Bradshaw performing in July.
Jeff Bradshaw / / facebook

Listen to Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend

Hosts Robert Shahid and Mykel Hunter interview jazz trombonist Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend.
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Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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August CD: Terri Lyne Carrington's "The Mosaic Project"

It’s all about the Ladies on the latest release of Grammy Award winning percussionist, drummer, composer and producer Terri Lyne Carrington.
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Jazz Master of the Month: James Spaulding

By some standards James Spaulding is considered to be under-recognized and under-appreciated. But most Jazz fans know him as one of the most critically acclaimed alto saxophonists and flautists in the business.
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