Robert Dear, suspect in the Planned Parenthood shooting.
Colorado Springs Police Dept.

First Edition Nov 30: CO Planned Parenthood Shooting; Day One of William Porter's Trial

Is the inflammatory rhetoric of the GOP’s Conservative right wing partly to blame for the recent shooting at a Colorado Planned Parenthood clinic? Sean Yoes talks national politics with commentators Catalina Byrd and Sean Breeze. Plus, legal analysis of the first day of Officer William Porter’s trial, one of the six officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray.
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In his first few weeks in office, Tanzanian President John Magufuli has made big changes to the country's finances. He's slashed government budgets for everything from celebrations to international travel.

Here's how Quartz describes it:

Amid growing criticism, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel said he has asked the city's top police officer to step down.

After announcing that he was appointing a task force to look at police accountability, Rahm said that "public trust" in the city's police force has been "shaken" and "eroded" so he has asked Superintendent Garry McCarthy to resign.

As soon as Donald Trump announced that he'd gained the endorsement of 100 black ministers from across the country on Monday, there were skeptics.

The claim came just days after the presidential candidate said of an African-American Black Lives Matter protester who was beaten up at a Trump event, "Maybe he deserved to be roughed up."

Kentucky Gov.-elect Matt Bevin, who takes office Dec. 8, plans to dismantle the state's successful health insurance exchange and shift consumers to the federal one. It's a campaign promise that has sparked controversy in the state.

Supporters of Kentucky's exchange, called Kynect, have asked Bevin to reconsider. They say the exchange created under Obamacare and an expansion of Medicaid have improved public health by dramatically increasing the number of Kentuckians with health coverage.

There's a place in the city of Tijuana, Mexico, called El Bordo, which has always been somewhat reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic movie scene. The name comes from "the border," which is where it's located: right by the fence that separates the U.S. from Mexico, among the enormous paved canals that run through Southern California like concrete veins. Hundreds of people live in those canals, often in makeshift tents, the smell of sewage made ripe by the hot Tijuana sun. It's a place where many deportees try to get by. It's also a site of heavy drug use.

If you're a low-income woman, you're more likely to get screened for breast cancer if you live in a state that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act than in a state that didn't.

Recently, we've been talking a lot about onscreen diversity and how much browner TV has gotten in the past few years with shows like Empire, Master of None and Dr. Ken and showrunners like Shonda Rhimes and Nahnatchka Khan injecting more people of color into the system.

Call it an early Christmas present.

On Monday, the State Department released the largest batch yet of emails from Hillary Clinton's time as secretary of State that have been culled from the controversial private server she used.

Listen Up! Nov

3 hours ago

They connect via online services — especially Twitter — and in everyday life. Their ages range from 15 to 47, and their roles range from cheering attacks to plotting violence. And curbing their growth is a dynamic challenge without a simple solution: There are currently 900 active investigations into ISIS sympathizers in every American state.

Those are some of the findings of a new study that glimpses life "inside the bubble of American ISIS sympathizers, a diverse and diffuse scene that the FBI estimates include hundreds, if not thousands, of individuals."


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