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This Week on WEAA

First Edition Feb 21: HBCU Coalition Court Proceedings; Dr. Whitehead on Teaching Black History

On the final day of the court proceedings connected to the HBCU Coalition lawsuit against the state of Maryland, First Edition host Sean Yoes gets a report from AFRO reporter Deborah Bailey.

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Wealthy Radio host Deborah Owens.
Deborah Owens / Facebook

Wealthy Radio Feb 21

Barnaby Manor Elementary School Visit by Jay Baker at Oxon Hill, MD.
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mdgovpics/">Government of Maryland</a> / Flickr

Ellison Report, 2.19.17: K-12 Dilemmas; Does Trump Have a Foreign Policy?

Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Local designer Carlous Palmer.
Stacia Brown / The Rise of Charm City

Dressed and Highly Favored: a Bonus Episode from Rise of Charm City

Dressed and Highly Favored provides listeners with a brief window into Black Baltimore's history of fashion merchandising and design.

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Ali Post / Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Episode Twelve: Glow in the Park

Mawish Raza / Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City

Episode Eleven: The Rise of Charm City — Live!

NPR News

Will the election of Donald Trump, who once boasted of grabbing women by the genitalia and has a history of sexist remarks, create of wave of female candidates at all levels of government in the coming years?

Early signs from the groups that work with women considering a bid for office suggest a level of intense interest not seen in at least a quarter century.

Katy Noble had never considered getting involved in politics until she woke up the day after Trump's surprise victory over Hillary Clinton.

President Trump wants to hire 5,000 more Border Patrol agents and 10,000 more Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers to enforce his executive orders on immigration.

It wont be easy.

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly was blunt when asked by a member of Congress about it. He said he will add to the ranks "as fast as we can."

But he quickly added, "we will not lower standards and we will not lower training." Kelly then said he didn't believe "we're going to get 10,000 and 5,000 on board within the next couple of years."

Sen. John McCain made an unannounced trip to northern Syria last week to meet with U.S. forces stationed there, his office announced on Wednesday.

McCain, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, went to discuss the campaign for defeating militants from the Islamic State.

"Sen. McCain's visit was a valuable opportunity to assess dynamic conditions on the ground in Syria and Iraq," according to a statement from spokeswoman Julie Tarallo.

The trip, which is considered official travel, was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election.

Keitra Bates is standing in front of an empty storefront on the west side of Atlanta, Ga. The walls are yellow-painted stucco over cinderblocks, with iron bars on the windows and doors, and a small side yard littered with abandoned tires. A corner store, the Fair Street Superette, is next door.

No matter where you stand on the political spectrum, health care under the Affordable Care Act is going to change in the next few years. The Republican-led Congress has vowed to "repeal and replace" the health law known as Obamacare.

That has left many people anxious and confused about what will happen and when. So NPR's Morning Edition asked listeners to post questions on Twitter and Facebook, and we will be answering some of them here and on the radio in the weeks ahead.

Scientists around the United States are getting ready to do an unprecedented experiment: They plan to march en masse in Washington, D.C., and other cities on April 22, to take a stand for the importance of public policies based on science.

Some researchers predict that this March for Science will release much needed energy and enthusiasm at a time when science is under threat; others worry it will damage science's reputation as an unbiased seeker of truth.

Cressida Dick Named Scotland Yard's First Female Top Cop

2 hours ago

London's Metropolitan Police Service, better known as Scotland Yard, is Britain's oldest and biggest police force. More than 43,000 officers and staff work for the organization.

On Wednesday, Cressida Dick, 56, was named as the first female police commissioner in the organization's 188-year history.

In a statement, the former beat cop from London's West End, said she was "thrilled and humbled" by the appointment.

From 2011 to 2014 Dick was head of counterterrorism, and among other operations, she oversaw security for the 2012 London Olympics.

Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race, his comments on illegal immigration have been pored over in the press — from vows to deport millions of people to promises that any enforcement plan would have "a lot of heart." Observers asked, again and again, how rhetoric would translate into actual policy.

Now activists and experts have the policies themselves to examine.

Local law enforcement officers have arrested some people who chose not to evacuate federal land near part of the Dakota Access Pipeline north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Most protesters had left earlier. At dusk, police moved back, and said they would not enter the camp at that time.

Democrat Michelle Frankard of Wisconsin voted for President Trump, and she's hoping she won't regret it.

At the Garden of Eatin', a bustling diner in picturesque Galesville, Frankard is having breakfast with her adopted father, Ken Horton. A dozen shiny electric guitars line the walls, each next to a black-and-white framed poster with the likes of Johnny Cash and Janis Joplin. The deep-seated booths host a variety of regulars and those just passing through.

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Jazz Master of the Month

Jazz Master of the Month: Nancy Wilson

With more than s ixty years in the music business, over seventy albums, and three Grammys, 79-year-old singer self-described “song stylist” Nancy Wilson still holds an audience in the palm of her hand when she sings.

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Watch: The Bassman Sits Down with Vocalist Gregory Porter

The Bassman sits down with Grammy Award winning vocalist Gregory Porter in a intimate conversation about his life and music.

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February CD: Reverence

The latest CD of famed Grammy award-winning Composer and Bassist Nathan East has arrived. Reverence is the follow-up to his long awaited self-titled debut CD.

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Coalition of day laborers and allies protesting  Ron's Temp Staffing violations of the Day Labor Service Act in 2006.
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagojwj/">Carlos Fernandez</a> / Flickr

We Don't Need a "Temporary Economy." We Need a Responsible Job Creation Act Now

All of us are feeling it. We see it happening every day. While representing constituents in Illinois’ 103 rd district, I watch the tragedy of an entire state losing good, blue collar jobs on a constant basis.

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In the Community

February Community Cares: The Dream Academy Inc.

The Dream Academy Inc. works with children of the incarcerated who have faced tremendous obstacles in their lives, including poverty and low-performing schools. The goal is to provide committed, caring adults who can make a difference and help children fix these gaps, and find self-esteem and direction in their young lives.

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WEAA Featured on Medium.com's List of 8 Music Stations to Hear in 2017

NFCB Membership Program Director Ernesto Aguilar included WEAA in an article about the 8 music stations to hear in 2017, published on Medium.com.

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Remembering WEAA's First Day of Broadcasting: January 10, 1977

WEAA first began broadcasting on January 10, 1977. For the station's 40th anniversary, read the story of WEAA's first year, as told in a 1977 issue of Morgan Magazine.

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