Local News

In Baltimore, Rec Centers Provide So Much More Than Just Fun

On a recent day at Baltimore's Lillian S. Jones Recreation Center, adolescent boys play basketball, while a group of girls play Monopoly at a nearby table. There's also air hockey, foosball and a computer room in back.Director Brandi Murphy says there are also swim classes, science lessons, arts and crafts. But the center gives the kids — students age 5 to 12 who come after school and in the summer — far more than fun things to do."We are mom, dad, aunt, cousin. They come here to get what...
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NPR News

Editor's Note: NPR Shanghai correspondent Frank Langfitt once drove a taxi as a summer job. He decided to do it again, this time offering free rides around Shanghai in exchange for stories about one of the world's most dynamic cities. Here's his latest installment.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, whose political career has taken almost as many turns as a roulette wheel at an Atlantic City Casino, is running for president.

He made the announcement today at Livingston High School, which he attended and was class president.

Declaring "America is tired of hand wringing and indecisiveness and weakness" in the White House, Christie said he is ready "to fight for the people of the United States of America."

The Internet is abuzz about the latest Easter egg found in Apple's Siri, as the virtual assistant gives a philosophical – and, to some, a personal – response to the question "What is zero divided by zero?"

Siri's on-screen answer is straightforward. But her more elaborate verbal reply easily surpasses the simple "Does not compute" with which robots in old sci-fi movies used to announce a bout of cognitive dissonance. For one thing, her answer invokes Cookie Monster.

Supreme Court justices have been turning heads this month with their choice of words as well as with their landmark rulings.

June decisions have given us Justice Elena Kagan's bountiful Spiderman allusions, Chief Justice John Roberts' exclamation of "What chumps!" and Justice Antonin Scalia's exhortation to "Ask the nearest hippie."

"Life is a funny thing, you know," says a character in Naomi Jackson's The Star Side of Bird Hill. "Just when you think you know what you're doing, which way you're headed, the target moves." He makes a good point — our lives have a way of taking detours without our consent, and the result can be like riding in a car that drives itself.

Everyone agrees on one thing: on the night of August 18th 2006, Dwayne Buckle catcalled Patreese Johnson.

Johnson and six of her friends, all young lesbians of color, were walking down Sixth Avenue in New York City's West Village to hang out at the clubs in one of the gayest neighborhoods in America. That's when Buckle, a then-28-year-old black filmmaker, called out to Johnson, who was 19 at the time, with an obscene comment.

"Mister, I'm gay," Johnson says she told Buckle, trying to wave him off.

Jeb Bush will release 33 years of tax returns later this afternoon, a Bush campaign aide confirms to NPR.

"This is more than any presidential candidate in the history of the United States," Bush spokeswoman Allie Brandenburger wrote in an email. "This display of transparency is consistent with the high level of disclosure he has practiced during his life in public office."

Only 1,599,888,909 euros to go. A crowd-funding effort to raise the 1.6 billion euros (about $1.8 billion) Greece needs to make a loan payment to the International Monetary Fund has so far raised 111,091 euros ($124,569) from 7,275 donors.

The organizer of the effort on IndieGogo says the European Union's 503 million people need to chip in just over 3 euros each ($3.37).

The final of the Women's World Cup isn't until Sunday. But it might as well be tonight, as world No. 1 Germany takes on the second-ranked United States in the semifinals. The U.S. and Germany have played four previous times in the World Cup, including a semifinal in 2003 (won by Germany).

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Music News

June CD: Robert Glasper's "Covered"

One of the most important artists in music today returns with a brand new release on the Blue Note Label, and continues to move music forward. Pianist and composer Robert Glasper is hot off the heels of his Grammy-award-winning Black Radio 2 with his Experiment Band. Now he returns to his straight-ahead roots with Covered, recording once again with his original acoustic trio comprised of bassist Vicente Archer and drummer Damion Reid, who recorded Glasper’s first two releases for Blue Note...
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