This Week on WEAA

A memorial for the shooting at Emanuel AME Church, Charleston, SC.
Matt Drobnik / Flickr

First Edition Oct 6: Dissecting Terrorism and Mass Shootings; Baltimore Public Housing Reform

In terms of terrorism in the U.S., are radicalized Muslims or white supremacists the greater threat? Sean Yoes brings a panel on First Edition to discuss a New York Times report that posits that since 9/11, white supremacists have posed a greater threat than jihadists. Then: how will public housing policy be reformed in the wake of what has been dubbed the ‘Sex for Service Scandal'? The phone lines are open to get thoughts of listeners.
Read More

NPR News

A new analysis of data from Fukushima suggests children exposed to the March 2011 nuclear accident may be developing thyroid cancer at an elevated rate.

But independent experts say that the study, published in the journal Epidemiology, has numerous shortcomings and does not prove a link between the accident and cancer.

To Prevent The Next Plague, Listen To Boie Jalloh

51 minutes ago

This is a landmark week in West Africa. For the first time since the Ebola outbreak, there were no new cases reported in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

There are many unsung heroes who deserve credit for this milestone. One of them is Dr. Boie Jalloh, age 30. Ten days after he showed up for his medical residency at 34th Military Hospital in Freetown, Sierra Leone, he received a letter requesting his presence at the hospital's newly constructed Ebola unit.

Parents who are uneasy about their own math skills often worry about how best to teach the subject to their kids.

Well ... there's an app for that. Tons of them, in fact. And a study published today in the journal Science suggests that at least one of them works pretty well for elementary school children and math-anxious parents.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., is suing the manufacturers of an exercise band that he says failed and caused him to lose vision in his right eye in January.

If you asked me the scariest place I've ever been, I would instantly say the Democratic Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire, whose cruel past has led to a disastrous present. I'll never forget lying in my hotel bed and hearing the nightly machine gun fire on the nearby streets. And this was during peacetime, not during Congo's two largely-ignored wars of the 1990s and early 2000s that killed three times as many people as the current wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria combined.

British artist Andy Goldsworthy works in the fields and forests near his home in Scotland using natural elements as his media. His pieces have a tendency to collapse, decay and melt, but, as he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "It's not about art. It's just about life and the need to understand that a lot of things in life do not last."

There's a lot of worry about nearsightedness in children, with rates soaring in Southeast Asia as populations become more urban and educated. But maybe it also has something to do about how much Mom and Dad make you hit the books.

Firstborn children are 10 percent more likely to be nearsighted than latter-borns, according to a study published Thursday in JAMA Ophthalmology. And they're 20 percent more likely to be severely myopic.

Spencer Stone, one of three Americans who thwarted a terror attack on a Paris-bound train this summer, was stabbed early Thursday morning in Sacramento, Calif., according to an Air Force spokesman.

In a stunning turn of events, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., has withdrawn from the race to become the next speaker of the House.

McCarthy was the favorite ahead of Thursday's closed-door vote by House Republicans. He was in a three-way race for the top spot in the House with Reps. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Daniel Webster, R-Fla.

Tomorrow, Oct. 9, would have been John Lennon's 75th birthday. So for this week's Throwback Thursday we're sharing a live webcast we did about The Beatles back in February of 2003. At the time, police in Amsterdam had just discovered a bunch of incredibly rare tapes that were stolen from The Beatles and had been missing for 30 years. So we had author Bruce Spizer in to talk about the newly recovered recordings. Bruce wrote The Beatles On Apple Records, and his conversation with host Bob Boilen dug deep into the Beatles' legacy and explained the history of the lost tapes.


Put the WE in WEAA

Volunteer for our upcoming Membership Drive!

Listen Live

Music News

Kamasi Washington and Marcellus Bassman Shepard at WEAA
Marcellus Shepard / WEAA

Watch Kamasi Washington as he sits down with the Bassman on the Cool Jazz Countdown

Saxophonist Kamasi Washington sits down with Marcellus Bassman Shepard on the Cool Jazz Countdown to talk about his CD "The Epic".
Read More

Jazz Master of the Month: Erroll Louis Garner

The word “genius” is thrown around so often that when it truly should be used, it’s often not taken seriously. Make no mistake—Erroll Louis Garner was a genius.
Read More
Wilton Felder on his album Gentle Fire (1983)
Wilton Felder / MCA Records

The Baltimore Blend Remembers the Late Wilton Felder

Wilton Felder passed away on September 27th. He was the last surviving member of the original Jazz Crusaders.
Read More
Mike Nyce / WEAA

Hip-Hop Chronicles Opens Up Dialogue on Climate Change

The Hip-Hop Chronicles hosted an Act on Climate Town Hall Broadcast moderated by Civ Jones.
Read More

Now Playing

WEAA 88.9 FM

Anthony McCarthy spoke at the Ascertainment Breakfast.
Kim Chase / / WEAA News

Watch Highlights from WEAA's Ascertainment Breakfast

Video highlights of WEAA's Community Ascertainment breakfast, which took place on August 27 at the James E. Lewis Museum of Art on Morgan State campus.
Read More

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Fiesta Musical

National Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 - October 15. Guillermo Brown, host of Fiesta Musical, explains the month and invites listeners to join him to celebrate.
Read More

88 Days of Summer

Jazzy Summer Nights

Trombonist Jeff Bradshaw Opens Return of Series