This Week on WEAA

Used to treat HIV/AIDS, the anti-retroviral drug Truvada is a combination of tenofovir and emtricitabine.
Jeffrey Beall / 2012-05-26

First Edition Oct 1: War-Ravaged Syria; New Global HIV Guidelines

Sean Yoes covers Russian military actions in Syria, and the efforts of refugees to flee the war-ravaged country. Also, Yoes discusses a series of new HIV guidelines from the World Health Organization which have the potential to impact millions of infected individuals globally — including Baltimore residents.
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NPR News

It sounds like a politician's dream: a machine that can tell you exactly what to say to change a voter's mind.

Well, that's what a political scientist has come up with — at least, a first tentative step in that direction.

Using text from a pro-Obamacare website and testing different combinations of sentences on volunteers, an algorithm created by Northeastern University assistant professor Nick Beauchamp was able to identify optimally persuasive terms that make people more inclined to support the landmark health care law.

America's retirement statistics are grim: about 40 percent of Baby Boomers have nothing saved for retirement, about a third of Americans who are currently retired rely on Social Security for almost all of their income, and the outlook for current workers isn't much better. About half of private sector employees have no retirement plan on the job.

Among the institutions devastated by the flooding in South Carolina is the home of a ballet company.

Dancers from around the world have come to Columbia to dance in the Columbia Classical Ballet Company, founded more than 20 years ago by Radenko Pavlovich.

Now the company's 32 members have nowhere to rehearse or take classes. Their building, renovated just this summer, has been completely destroyed.

During the flooding, water reached up to the ceiling of the studio. Costumes and music scores were ruined.

The signs read: "Take 'em down, Renoir sucks" and "We're not iconoclasts, Renoir just sucks at painting."

Led by Max Geller, a handful of people protested Monday outside Boston's Museum of Fine Arts.

Their grievance?

The fact that paintings by renowned French impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir are hanging in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

For many students, Sandra Cisneros is required reading. She tells stories of working-class Latino life in America, particularly Chicago, where she grew up, and where she set her well-known book, The House on Mango Street.

The meaning of home has been a central theme in Cisneros' life and work. And in her new memoir, A House of My Own, she writes about leaving home, her parents' house — without getting married, which was a shock to her father.

We want to cut through the spin with a new feature we're calling "Break It Down."

Break It Down is going to be a regular part of our campaign coverage. We're going to try some new things. It might read a little differently from time to time. But our goal is to zoom in on what the candidates are saying, and give you the factual breakdown you need to make a sound judgment.

A former president of the U.N. General Assembly, John Ashe, is accused of accepting more than $1.3 million in bribes in return for his support of a real estate project in Macau, according to U.S. court documents.

Ashe is a former U.N. ambassador for Antigua and Barbuda who led the General Assembly from 2013 to 2014. He lives in New York state.

NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports:

Under the cover of darkness and using a crane, workers removed a 6-foot granite structure from the grounds of the Capitol in Oklahoma City.

The Ten Commandments monument has been the subject of controversy and debate for years. Back in June, the state Supreme Court decided that the religious display on public property violated the Constitution.

At the time, angry lawmakers even threatened to impeach the high court justices.

The sun was shining in South Carolina Tuesday, but people are still trying to recover from heavy rains that caused 18 dams to breach or fail in the state. Since severe flooding began over the weekend, at least 16 deaths have been reported, including two people who died in North Carolina.

One of the more unattractive aspects of Washington life is the growth industry called line sitting. That is, rich lobbyists, lawyers and contractors pay someone to hold a place in line so the payer can get a much-in-demand seat at a Supreme Court argument or a congressional hearing. Now the U.S. Supreme Court has quietly struck one small blow for equality on that front. It has amended its rules to require that there are no sitters on the special line reserved for members of the Supreme Court bar.


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Music News

Wilton Felder on his album Gentle Fire (1983)
Wilton Felder / MCA Records

The Baltimore Blend Remembers the Late Wilton Felder

Wilton Felder passed away on September 27th. He was the last surviving member of the original Jazz Crusaders.
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Mike Nyce / WEAA

Hip-Hop Chronicles Opens Up Dialogue on Climate Change

The Hip-Hop Chronicles hosted an Act on Climate Town Hall Broadcast moderated by Civ Jones.
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Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Fiesta Musical

National Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 - October 15. Guillermo Brown, host of Fiesta Musical, explains the month and invites listeners to join him to celebrate.
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WEAA 88.9 FM

Anthony McCarthy spoke at the Ascertainment Breakfast.
Kim Chase / / WEAA News

Watch Highlights from WEAA's Ascertainment Breakfast

Video highlights of WEAA's Community Ascertainment breakfast, which took place on August 27 at the James E. Lewis Museum of Art on Morgan State campus.
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Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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88 Days of Summer

Jazzy Summer Nights

Trombonist Jeff Bradshaw Opens Return of Series