This Week on WEAA

D. Watkins, author of The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America.
@AaronMMaybin / / Twitter

First Edition Sept 3: Living and Dying While Black in America

D. Watkins, author of The Beast Side: Living and Dying While Black in America, joins Sean Yoes to talk about politics, race, education, and more.
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NPR News

It was a sad day in Houston, as the family, friends and colleagues of Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Darren Goforth attended his funeral Friday. In an apparent attempt to ease their grief, a couple who were at the gas station where Goforth was killed came forward Friday to tell the family that after he was attacked, they had sat with the deputy to wait for help.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's Note: This report contains a racial slur.

A new play reveals some little-known history about the land that became New York City's Central Park: People used to live there.

Beginning in 1825, about 300 people — mainly free African-Americans — lived in a village that spanned a portion of the park's 843 acres in Manhattan, between 82nd and 89th streets, east of Central Park West. It was called Seneca Village.

By now, you've probably seen the photo of Aylan Kurdi, the 3-year-old refugee from Syria who died with his 5-year-old brother and mother after their small rubber boat capsized on its way to Greece. You might remember his Velcro shoes. His red shirt. His lifeless body lying face down in the sand.

It's that time of year when some gardeners and tomato-coveting shoppers face a vexing question: What on earth am I going to do with all these tomatoes I grew (or bought)?

A select few up to their elbows in tomatoes may have an additional quandary: How am I going to prepare different kinds of tomatoes to honor their unique qualities?

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine hits theaters today. Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney's documentary joins a growing list of biopics and biographies that have come out since Jobs' death in 2011. But, it adds a new perspective on the increasingly well-known facts of his life. Gibney's thesis seems to be that Jobs' flawed character was infused into the machines he made, leaving us perhaps a little more flawed if we use them.

Justin Kauflin On Song Travels

3 hours ago

Jazz pianist Justin Kauflin attended William Paterson University, where he formed a friendship with his mentor, the late Clark Terry. Kauflin, who lost his vision at age 11, connected with the trumpeter, who was dealing with his own vision loss. Their journey together was chronicled in the 2014 documentary Keep On Keepin' On.

After spending the night in jail, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis tells her lawyers, "All is well," adding that she slept well. She also says she is prepared to stay in jail. And her legal team says the marriage licenses that were issued by the clerk's office today are invalid.

"She has a clean conscience, even though she's incarcerated behind these bars," attorney Mat Staver said Friday afternoon.

A New York City teacher was arrested today after allegedly crashing a drone into the stands during the U.S. Open tennis tournament Thursday night.

Citing police, The Associated Press reports that 26-year-old Daniel Verley has been charged with "reckless endangerment and operating a drone in a New York City public park outside of prescribed area."

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Music News

The Mighty Sound of Maryland traveled to New Orleans to help Habitat for Humanity construct new homes for musicians displaced by the storm, working with Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick, Jr.
Chris Ammann, Baltimore Examiner. 2007. / Flickr

Recommended Reading from the Bassman: Jazz in New Orleans, 10 Years After Katrina

Marcellus Shepard, Program/Music Director and host of "In the Groove," recommends a few reading materials about the role of jazz in the recovery of New Orleans.
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September CD: Lizz Wright's "Freedom & Surrender"

Here’s a vocalist that I fell in love with the very first time I heard her music. My love for her sound was deepened when she came into the WEAA studios nearly 10 years ago and sang live for me in studio. It was the most beautiful performance I’d ever witnessed up close and personal. Her name is Lizz Wright.
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Jazz Master of the Month: Gene Harris

Born in 1933 in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Gene Harris began teaching himself piano when he was nine years old. Admiring the playing style of pianist Oscar Peterson, Harris started touring and leading his own bands immediately after leaving the military service in 1954.
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Jeff Bradshaw performing in July.
Jeff Bradshaw / / facebook

Listen to Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend

Hosts Robert Shahid and Mykel Hunter interview jazz trombonist Jeff Bradshaw on The Baltimore Blend.
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Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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