Local News

A photo from Safe Streets' Twitter page. May 2012.
Safe Streets Baltimore / / Twitter

News Wrap: Baltimore Officials Anticipate Protests Next Week; Safe Streets Guns Linked to Shootings

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is working with city officials to prepare for potential protests next week as the Freddie Gray court hearings begin. The Baltimore Sun reports that these precautions include coordinating with law enforcement agencies around the state, upgrading riot gear, and conducting crowd-control training.
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This Week on WEAA

Alison Parker, tragically gunned down while reporting on Wednesday.
Virginia Western / / Twitter

First Edition Aug 27: Media Shooting in South Virginia; Frosh Fallout Continues

Sean Yoes discusses Wednesday’s tragic double murder/suicide in Virginia, in which gunman Vester Lee Flanagan took the lives of journalists Alison Parker and Adam Ward, with Veteran reporter Charles Robinson of Maryland Public Television's State Circle. Prince George County Delegate Aisha Braveboy and prominent defense attorney A. Dwight Pettit join Yoes to unpack his Wednesday interview with Attorney General Brian Frosh.
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NPR News

A white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black man on a Sunday last month in Cincinnati.

The campus police officer was charged with murder for fatally shooting Samuel Debose after pulling him over for a missing license plate.

By now we know the string of other similar events that have brought deep-seated racial tensions to the surface.

In case you didn't stay up late to watch the MTV Video Music Awards, there are really only two moments that matter.

They'll be the talk of the water cooler today, so you might as well take a look. Here are the two moments that matter:

1. After receiving the Video Vanguard award, the rapper Kanye West delivered a 13-minute soliloquy in which he sorta, kinda apologized for his past behavior and then he got ahead of the news cycle by announcing he's running for president in 2020.

The phrase police militarization conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. But familiar as that image is, we don't know how common it is. There are simply no good statistics on police tactical operations in America. The federal government doesn't keep track, and neither do the states — with one exception: Utah.

European ministers have called for an emergency summit to discuss the hundreds of thousands of migrants who are pouring into European countries.

As The New York Times reports, almost as soon as Germany, France and the U.K. made the call, Luxembourg, which currently holds the EU presidency, obliged by setting a meeting date for Sept. 14 in Brussels.

The Times reports:

After sitting down with President Obama, addressing Congress and speaking at the United Nations, Pope Francis will meet with some unique soccer players in New York City in September.

They're migrant teenagers in a youth soccer program co-sponsored by New York's Catholic Charities.

Participation in sports by girls and young women has soared in recent decades — by 560 percent among high school students since 1972, and 990 percent among college students, according to the Women's Sports Foundation. Highly committed young female athletes now run track and play soccer, basketball, water polo and other demanding sports that require strong bodies.

As a culture, we tend to ignore the advice to eat more fish. On average, Americans eat about 3.5 ounces of seafood per week. (Think a can of tuna or sardines).

But evidence shows that consumption of 8 or more ounces of seafood per week can reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and some studies have linked a regular fish habit over a lifetime to a lower risk of cognitive decline as well.

It seems to be part of human nature to want to belong to a group. People constantly form groups, in all kinds of situations, and high-stakes negotiations on climate change are no exception.

Ever heard of the Umbrella Group? Or the Like-Minded Developing Countries? How about the Group of 77? (Here's a hint — it doesn't actually have 77 countries.)

The current front-runner in the Republican presidential primary, Donald Trump, is sparking a debate about immigration that's beginning to alienate some conservative Latinos.

"He drowns out a lot of the conservative field, and it's very bad for the Republican Party," said Ricky Salabarria, a 22-year-old consultant with a pair of Ray-Ban sunglasses tucked into his pink dress shirt.

Salabarria was among a half-dozen young conservatives at a networking event in Northern Virginia. He's from Florida, and his family is originally from Cuba and Spain.

The White House announced Sunday that President Obama is changing the name of North America's highest peak.

Mount McKinley — named after William McKinley, the 25th president, who served in the White House until his assassination in 1901 — is returning to its traditional Alaska Native name, Denali.

Obama will make a public announcement of the name change in Anchorage Monday, during a three-day visit to Alaska.

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Music News

Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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August CD: Terri Lyne Carrington's "The Mosaic Project"

It’s all about the Ladies on the latest release of Grammy Award winning percussionist, drummer, composer and producer Terri Lyne Carrington.
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Jazz Master of the Month: James Spaulding

By some standards James Spaulding is considered to be under-recognized and under-appreciated. But most Jazz fans know him as one of the most critically acclaimed alto saxophonists and flautists in the business.
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