Thomas Jayoord

EllisonReport Nov 20: The #ParisAttack Political Map; Changing #2016 Landscape; #MinimumWage

This week’s ER examines the impact of the post-Paris attack on the political map; populist Republicanism vs. corporate Republicanism; Analysis of the Middle East battle space; the relationship between media and presidential candidates; a deeper look at the pros and cons of a minimum wage hike.
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NPR News

A controversial government surveillance program has come to an end. As of midnight, the United States National Security Agency has stopped the bulk collection of the metadata from Americans' phone calls.

This week’s installment of The ER: comparing race-based and class-based affirmative action: which one is it? The troubling aspects of the language employed in this election. Examining the policy response to migration trends. The future of polling. Is Trump trending from his frontrunner status? The linkage between racist cops – and history textbooks.   

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French police fired tear gas to break up a group of activists defying a ban on mass demonstrations in Paris on Sunday.

The activists were gathered on the eve of a huge United Nations climate conference, which will bring together leaders from across the world.

Following the terrorist attacks of Nov. 13, France declared a state of emergency and banned huge rallies that had been planned to coincide with the COP21 climate summit.

A big winter storm that moved east from Texas through Iowa is being blamed for at least seven deaths.

CNN reports that authorities in Kansas say four people died in car accidents caused by freezing rain and at least three people were killed because of flooding in a Dallas suburb.

CNN adds:

As Colorado Springs held vigils for those killed during a shooting rampage at a Planned Parenthood clinic, we are learning more about the alleged gunman and his possible motive.

Police say Robert Lewis Dear, 57, killed three people and left nine wounded.

In 1964, near the end of his career, Billy Strayhorn accompanied himself on a live recording of one of his best-known songs. It starts:

I used to visit all the very gay places

Those come-what-may places

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Cultural Exploration Via Cruise Ships Starts On Board

7 hours ago
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit


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Thursday Morning Jam Session: Remembering Arnold Sterling

The Baltimore Blend honors the life of Arnold Sterling, a Baltimore native and nationally recognized jazz saxophonist, through conversations with those he taught and loved.
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November CD: Spur of the Moment's "N2 Deep"

I got excited when I heard the DC-based band Spur of the Moment was recording a new project. Spur of the Moment has been blessing us with some incredible music for the last two decades. After a hiatus from recording, they return with an incredible CD titled, “N2 Deep.”
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November Community Cares Partner: Office of Student Activites

Morgan State University’s Office of Student Activities strives to foster a campus environment that promotes the total education of each student. Its primary goal is to assist individual students and student organizations in the creation, implementation and evaluation of programs that contribute to the academic growth and personal development of all students.
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WEAA Launches Documentary Series: "Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City"

WEAA is proud to announce “Baltimore: The Rise of Charm City” — a new project produced by Stacia Brown and funded through AIR media.
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Jazz Master of the Month: Charlie Rouse

Charlie Rouse was born in Washington D.C. in 1924, and is mostly remembered as Thelonious Monk’s featured tenor saxophonist from 1959 to 1970. His articulate solos were always full of joy, with each of his fluid phrases perfectly connected to the one before.
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