This Week on WEAA

Used to treat HIV/AIDS, the anti-retroviral drug Truvada is a combination of tenofovir and emtricitabine.
Jeffrey Beall / 2012-05-26

First Edition Oct 1: War-Ravaged Syria; New Global HIV Guidelines

Sean Yoes covers Russian military actions in Syria, and the efforts of refugees to flee the war-ravaged country. Also, Yoes discusses a series of new HIV guidelines from the World Health Organization which have the potential to impact millions of infected individuals globally — including Baltimore residents.
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NPR News

It begins with a solitary Russian underground in Leningrad in 1937, in a train tunnel not yet completed — an artist censoring photographs for the state, removing the images of traitors from the official history of a place already expert at removing people.

It ends with a solitary Russian in a space capsule, year unknown, listening to an ancient cassette tape as he passes out beyond the orbit of Pluto.

The Federal Aviation Administration is proposing to fine a Chicago based drone operator 1.9 million dollars for repeatedly violating FAA regulations and flying in restricted airspace. The FAA charges the company, SkyPan International, conducted 65 flights in the skies over Chicago and New York, some of the nations most restricted and congested airspace. Fourty-three of the flights took place over New York, without clearance from air traffic controllers.

You've heard it a million times; the hours we spend sitting in front of our computers, sitting in front of the TV and sitting just about everywhere else are adding up. We are sitting ourselves to death.

So it came as welcome news when we read last week that just 10 minutes – 10 minutes! — of walking after sitting for a long period of time can restore the damage to our vascular system.

It's hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the last 20 years.

Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress.

What's going on? Well, the debate over guns is hardly ever solely about background checks or other seemingly popular measures intended to curb gun violence.

The Federal Aviation Administration is proposing a $1.9 million fine against an aerial photography company the agency says took 65 unauthorized flights using drones.

"Flying unmanned aircraft in violation of the Federal Aviation Regulations is illegal and can be dangerous," FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said in statement. "We have the safest airspace in the world, and everyone who uses it must understand and observe our comprehensive set of rules and regulations."

Two leading fantasy sports companies are promising to protect "the integrity of the games" they offer customers, after questions emerged over whether their employees use proprietary information to win thousands of dollars.

The two companies, Draft Kings and FanDuel, released a joint statement this week saying they "have strong policies in place to ensure that employees do not misuse any information at their disposal and strictly limit access to company data to only those employees who require it to do their jobs."

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"This is unacceptable." That's what NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg had to say about Russian military aircraft violating Turkey's airspace twice this weekend. Stoltenberg also has said he doubts Russia's explanation that it was an accident.

At issue most recently is the Turkish military's allegation that on Sunday, "a MiG-29 plane of unidentified nationality for five minutes and 40 seconds kept two Turkish F-16 planes on its radar as potential targets," reports the Russian news agency Tass.

Even though President Obama has not yet released details of the Trans-Pacific Partnership announced Monday, supporters and opponents are making their voices heard — at full volume.

Business leaders and interest groups hope their impassioned pleas will sway Congress, which must vote on the proposed deal next year.

This is what the cheers sounded like:

Two scientists from Canada and Japan have won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 for opening "a new realm in particle physics," the Nobel Prize committee says. Working far apart, both Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald showed how neutrinos shift identities like chameleons in space.


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Wilton Felder on his album Gentle Fire (1983)
Wilton Felder / MCA Records

The Baltimore Blend Remembers the Late Wilton Felder

Wilton Felder passed away on September 27th. He was the last surviving member of the original Jazz Crusaders.
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Mike Nyce / WEAA

Hip-Hop Chronicles Opens Up Dialogue on Climate Change

The Hip-Hop Chronicles hosted an Act on Climate Town Hall Broadcast moderated by Civ Jones.
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Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Fiesta Musical

National Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 - October 15. Guillermo Brown, host of Fiesta Musical, explains the month and invites listeners to join him to celebrate.
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Anthony McCarthy spoke at the Ascertainment Breakfast.
Kim Chase / / WEAA News

Watch Highlights from WEAA's Ascertainment Breakfast

Video highlights of WEAA's Community Ascertainment breakfast, which took place on August 27 at the James E. Lewis Museum of Art on Morgan State campus.
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Terence Blanchard at UVA's Old Cabell Hall in March.
Bob Travis / Flickr

Watch Terence Blanchard's In-Studio Interview at WEAA

Blue Note Recording artist and multi Grammy award-winning trumpeter Terence Blanchard stopped by the WEAA studios at the end of June to chop it up with the Bassman.
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